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Verdi
Author: John Suchet
Publisher:
ISBN: 1783963301
Pages: 288
Year: 2017
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Genius, patriot, pessimist, atheist: an exploration of Italy's best-loved composer, Giuseppe Verdi
Verdi
Author: John Suchet
Publisher:
ISBN: 178396331X
Pages: 347
Year: 2017
View: 915
Read: 501

Verdi: The Man Revealed
Author: John Suchet
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1681778297
Pages: 288
Year: 2018-07-03
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Giuseppe Verdi remains Italy’s greatest operatic composer and a man of apparent contradictions—vividly brought to life through a nuanced examination of his life and monumental music. Giuseppe Verdi remains the greatest operatic composer that Italy, the home of opera, has ever produced. Yet throughout his lifetime he claimed to detest composing and repeatedly rejected it. He was a landowner, a farmer, a politician and symbol of Italian independence; but his music tells a different story. An obsessive perfectionist, Verdi drove collaborators to despair but his works lauded from the start as dazzling feats of composition and characterization. From Rigoletto to Otello, La Traviatato to Aida, Verdi’s canon encompassed the full range of human emotion. His private life was no less complex: he suffered great loss, and went out of his way to antagonize supporters and his own family. An outspoken advocate of Italian independence and a sharp critic of the church, he was often at odds with nineteenth-century society. In Verdi: The Man Revealed, John Suchet attempts to get under the skin of perhaps the most private composer who ever lived. Unraveling his protestations, his deliberate embellishments and disavowals, Suchet reveals the true character of this great artist—and the art for which he will be forever known.
Mozart: The Man Revealed
Author: John Suchet
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 168177576X
Pages: 288
Year: 2017-08-08
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The illustrated life-story of the world’s most beloved composer, bringing vividly to life the man himself, his influences, achievements, and the glittering milieu of the Habsburg empire in eighteenth-century Europe. We think we know the story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's life. Austrian-born to a tyrannical father who worked him fiercely; unhappily married to a spendthrift woman; a child-like character ill at ease amid the aristocratic splendor of the Viennese court; a musical genius who died young thus depriving the world of future glories. Yet only that last point is actually true. In this comprehensive biography, John Suchet examines the many myths and misunderstandings surrounding the world's best-loved composer. From his early days as a child prodigy performing for the imperial royal family in Vienna to the last months of his short life, driven to exhaustion by a punitive workload, one thing remained constant: his happy disposition. Through trials and tribulations, grand successes and disheartening setbacks, Suchet shows us the real Mozart—blessed with an abundance of talent yet sometimes struggling to earn a living. His mischievous nature and earthy sense of humor, his ease and confidence in his own incredible abilities; these were traits that never left him. His music has brought comfort to countless generations; his life, though brief, is no less fascinating.
Verdi
Author: Mary Jane Phillips-Matz
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198166001
Pages: 941
Year: 1996
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Written with exclusive access to the original Verdi family documents, this book explores the facts behind the myths of this extraordinary figure. Previously unknown aspects of Verdi's life are exposed in this biography, which took 30 years to write.
Waiting for Verdi
Author: Mary Ann Smart
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520966570
Pages: 256
Year: 2018-06-29
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The name Giuseppe Verdi conjures images of Italians singing opera in the streets and bursting into song at political protests or when facing the firing squad. While many of the accompanying stories were exaggerated, or even invented, by later generations, Verdi's operas—along with those by Rossini, Donizetti, and Mercadante—did inspire Italians to imagine Italy as an independent and unified nation. Capturing what it was like to attend the opera or to join in the music at an aristocratic salon, Waiting for Verdi shows that the moral dilemmas, emotional reactions, and journalistic polemics sparked by these performances set new horizons for what Italians could think, feel, say, and write. Among the lessons taught by this music were that rules enforced by artistic tradition could be broken, that opera could jolt spectators into intense feeling even as it educated them, and that Italy could be in the vanguard of stylistic and technical innovation rather than clinging to the glories of centuries past. More practically, theatrical performances showed audiences that political change really was possible, making the newly engaged spectator in the opera house into an actor on the political stage.
The Last Waltz
Author: John Suchet
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250094119
Pages: 288
Year: 2016-05-10
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Captured in a beautiful package, including more than fifty color photographs, The Last Waltz tells the intriguing story of of the Viennese Strauss family known for producing some of the best known, best loved music of the nineteenth century. Johann and Josef Strauss, the Waltz Kings, composed hundreds of instantly recognizable and enduring melodies, including The Blue Danube Waltz, Tales from the Vienna Woods, Voices of Spring and The Radetzky March. Their iconic music has been featured on the scores of nearly a thousand films. Yet despite their success, this was a family riven with tension, feuds and jealousy, living in a country that was undergoing seismic upheaval. Through the personal and political chaos, the Strauss family continued to compose music to which the Viennese – anxious to forget their troubles – could dance and drank champagne, even as their country hurtled towards oblivion at the hands of the First World War. Classical music expert and radio host John Suchet skillfully portrays this gripping story, capturing the family dramas, the tensions, triumphs and disasters against the turbulent backdrop of Austria in the nineteenth century, from revolution to regicide.
The man Verdi
Author: Frank Walker
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 526
Year: 1962
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Verdi in Victorian London
Author: Massimo Zicari
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
ISBN: 178374216X
Pages: 360
Year: 2016-07-11
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Now a byword for beauty, Verdi’s operas were far from universally acclaimed when they reached London in the second half of the nineteenth century. Why did some critics react so harshly? Who were they and what biases and prejudices animated them? When did their antagonistic attitude change? And why did opera managers continue to produce Verdi’s operas, in spite of their alleged worthlessness? Massimo Zicari’s Verdi in Victorian London reconstructs the reception of Verdi’s operas in London from 1844, when a first critical account was published in the pages of The Athenaeum, to 1901, when Verdi’s death received extensive tribute in The Musical Times. In the 1840s, certain London journalists were positively hostile towards the most talked-about representative of Italian opera, only to change their tune in the years to come. The supercilious critic of The Athenaeum, Henry Fothergill Chorley, declared that Verdi’s melodies were worn, hackneyed and meaningless, his harmonies and progressions crude, his orchestration noisy. The scribes of The Times, The Musical World, The Illustrated London News, and The Musical Times all contributed to the critical hubbub. Yet by the 1850s, Victorian critics, however grudging, could neither deny nor ignore the popularity of Verdi’s operas. Over the final three decades of the nineteenth century, moreover, London’s musical milieu underwent changes of great magnitude, shifting the manner in which Verdi was conceptualized and making room for the powerful influence of Wagner. Nostalgic commentators began to lament the sad state of the Land of Song, referring to the now departed "palmy days of Italian opera." Zicari charts this entire cultural constellation. Verdi in Victorian London is required reading for both academics and opera aficionados. Music specialists will value a historical reconstruction that stems from a large body of first-hand source material, while Verdi lovers and Italian opera addicts will enjoy vivid analysis free from technical jargon. For students, scholars and plain readers alike, this book is an illuminating addition to the study of music reception.
The Cambridge Companion to Verdi
Author: Scott L. Balthazar
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521635357
Pages: 336
Year: 2004-11-18
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This 2004 Companion provides an accessible introduction to Verdi's life and music.
And She Was
Author: Jessica Verdi
Publisher: Scholastic Inc.
ISBN: 1338150545
Pages: 368
Year: 2018-03-27
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Dara's lived a sheltered life with her single mom, Mellie. Now, at eighteen, she's dreaming of more. When Dara digs up her never-before-seen birth certificate, her world implodes. Why are two strangers listed as her parents? Dara confronts her mother, and is stunned by what she learns: Mellie is transgender. The unfamiliar name listed under "father"? That's Mellie. She transitioned when Dara was a baby, after Dara's birth mother died. She changed her name, started over. But Dara still has more questions than answers. Reeling, she sets off on an impromptu road trip with her best guy friend, Sam, in tow. She is determined to find the extended family she's never even met. What she does discover -- and what her mother reveals, piece by piece, over emails -- will challenge and change Dara more than she can imagine. This is a gorgeous, timely, and essential novel about the importance of being our true selves. The backmatter includes an author's note and resources for readers.
The Real Traviata
Author: René Weis, Rene Weis
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198708548
Pages: 416
Year: 2015
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The rags-to-riches story of a tragic young woman whose life inspired one of the most famous operas of all time, Verdi's masterpiece La traviata, as well as one of the most scandalous and most successful French novels of the nineteenth century, La Dame aux Camélias, by Alexandre Dumas fils. The woman at the centre of this story, Marie Duplessis, rose in a remarkably short time from an abused teenage girl in Normandy to become the queen ofParisian courtesans, at the apex of fashionable life in nineteenth century Paris. Her life was painfully short, but by sheer willpower, intelligence, talent, and stunning looks she attained such prominence in the French capitalthat ministers of the government and even members of the French royal family fell under her spell. And although now largely forgotten, in the years immediately after her death, Marie's legend if anything grew in stature, with her immortalization in Verdi's La traviata, an opera in which the great Romantic composer tried to capture her essence in some of the most heart-wrenching and lyrical music ever composed.
The Summer I Wasn't Me
Author: Jessica Verdi
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 140227789X
Pages: 352
Year: 2014-04-01
View: 459
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Lexi has a secret. She never meant for her mom to find out. And now she's afraid that what's left of her family is going to fall apart for good. Lexi knows she can fix everything. She can change. She can learn to like boys. New Horizons summer camp has promised to transform her life, and there's nothing she wants more than to start over. But sometimes love has its own path... "A powerful indictment of reparative therapy—a sweet love story—and an unforgettable main character!"—Nancy Garden, author of Annie on My Mind "Unflinching honesty and unfaltering compassion...A gem of a novel."—RT Book Reviews, 4 1⁄2 stars, Top Pick of the Month on My Life After Now
Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice
Author: Ellen Rosand
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520254260
Pages: 710
Year: 2007-10-09
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"In this elegantly constructed study of the early decades of public opera, the conflicts and cooperation of poets, composers, managers, designers, and singers—producing the art form that was soon to sweep the world and that has been dominant ever since—are revealed in their first freshness."—Andrew Porter "This will be a standard work on the subject of the rise of Venetian opera for decades. Rosand has provided a decisive contribution to the reshaping of the entire subject. . . . She offers a profoundly new view of baroque opera based on a solid documentary and historical-critical foundation. The treatment of the artistic self-consciousness and professional activities of the librettists, impresarios, singers, and composers is exemplary, as is the examination of their reciprocal relations. This work will have a positive effect not only on studies of 17th-century, but on the history of opera in general."—Lorenzo Bianconi
Witches and Jesuits
Author: Garry Wills
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195102908
Pages: 223
Year: 1995-01-01
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Drawing on his intimate knowledge of the vivid intrigue and drama of Jacobean England, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Lincoln at Gettysburg" restores Macbeth's suspenseful tension by returning it to the context of its own time, recreating the burning theological and political crises of Shakespeare's era.