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The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction
Author: Edward James, Farah Mendlesohn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521016576
Pages: 295
Year: 2003-11-20
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Science fiction is at the intersection of numerous fields. It is a literature which draws on popular culture, and which engages in speculation about science, history, and all types of social relations. This volume brings together essays by scholars and practitioners of science fiction, which look at the genre from these different angles. It examines science fiction from Thomas More to the present day, and introduces important critical approaches including Marxism, postmodernism, feminism and queer theory. A number of well-known science fiction writers contribute to this volume.
The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction
Author: Edward James, Farah Mendlesohn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107494672
Pages: 328
Year: 2003-11-20
View: 655
Read: 828
Science fiction is at the intersection of numerous fields. It is a literature which draws on popular culture, and which engages in speculation about science, history, and all types of social relations. This volume brings together essays by scholars and practitioners of science fiction, which look at the genre from these different angles. After an introduction to the nature of science fiction, historical chapters trace science fiction from Thomas More to more recent years, including a chapter on film and television. The second section introduces four important critical approaches to science fiction drawing their theoretical inspiration from Marxism, postmodernism, feminism and queer theory. The final and largest section of the book looks at various themes and sub-genres of science fiction. A number of well-known science fiction writers contribute to this volume, including Gwyneth Jones, Ken MacLeod, Brian Stableford Andy Duncan, James Gunn, Joan Slonczewski, and Damien Broderick.
The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction
Author: Edward James, Farah Mendlesohn
Publisher:
ISBN: 0511326378
Pages: 295
Year: 2003
View: 863
Read: 588
Science fiction is at the intersection of numerous fields; it draws on popular culture, and engages in speculation about science, history, and all types of social relations. This volume brings together essays by scholars and practitioners of science fiction, which look at the genre from different angles.
A Companion to Science Fiction
Author: David Seed
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405144580
Pages: 612
Year: 2008-04-15
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A Companion to Science Fiction assembles essays by an international range of scholars which discuss the contexts, themes and methods used by science fiction writers. This Companion conveys the scale and variety of science fiction. Shows how science fiction has been used as a means of debating cultural issues. Essays by an international range of scholars discuss the contexts, themes and methods used by science fiction writers. Addresses general topics, such as the history and origins of the genre, its engagement with science and gender, and national variations of science fiction around the English-speaking world. Maps out connections between science fiction, television, the cinema, virtual reality technology, and other aspects of the culture. Includes a section focusing on major figures, such as H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, and Ursula Le Guin. Offers close readings of particular novels, from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale.
The Cambridge Companion to American Science Fiction
Author: Gerry Canavan, Eric Carl Link
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107052467
Pages: 290
Year: 2015-01-26
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This Companion explores the relationship between the ideas and themes of American science fiction and their roots in the American cultural experience.
The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy Literature
Author: Edward James, Farah Mendlesohn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107493730
Pages: 298
Year: 2012-01-26
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Fantasy is a creation of the Enlightenment, and the recognition that excitement and wonder can be found in imagining impossible things. From the ghost stories of the Gothic to the zombies and vampires of twenty-first-century popular literature, from Mrs Radcliffe to Ms Rowling, the fantastic has been popular with readers. Since Tolkien and his many imitators, however, it has become a major publishing phenomenon. In this volume, critics and authors of fantasy look at its history since the Enlightenment, introduce readers to some of the different codes for the reading and understanding of fantasy, and examine some of the many varieties and subgenres of fantasy; from magical realism at the more literary end of the genre, to paranormal romance at the more popular end. The book is edited by the same pair who produced The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction (winner of a Hugo Award in 2005).
The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Science
Author: Steven Meyer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107079721
Pages: 324
Year: 2018-05-03
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This Companion shows how literature and science inform one another and that they're more closely aligned than they typically appear.
The Cambridge Companion to Science and Religion
Author: Peter Harrison
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521712513
Pages: 307
Year: 2010-06-24
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This book explores the historical relations between science and religion and discusses contemporary issues with perspectives from cosmology, evolutionary biology and bioethics.
The Cambridge Companion to Utopian Literature
Author: Gregory Claeys
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139828428
Pages:
Year: 2010-08-05
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Since the publication of Thomas More's genre-defining work Utopia in 1516, the field of utopian literature has evolved into an ever-expanding domain. This Companion presents an extensive historical survey of the development of utopianism, from the publication of Utopia to today's dark and despairing tendency towards dystopian pessimism, epitomised by works such as George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale. Chapters address the difficult definition of the concept of utopia, and consider its relation to science fiction and other literary genres. The volume takes an innovative approach to the major themes predominating within the utopian and dystopian literary tradition, including feminism, romance and ecology, and explores in detail the vexed question of the purportedly 'western' nature of the concept of utopia. The reader is provided with a balanced overview of the evolution and current state of a long-standing, rich tradition of historical, political and literary scholarship.
The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction
Author: Mark Bould, Andrew Butler, Adam Roberts, Sherryl Vint
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135228353
Pages: 576
Year: 2009-03-30
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The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction is a comprehensive overview of the history and study of science fiction. It outlines major writers, movements, and texts in the genre, established critical approaches and areas for future study. Fifty-six entries by a team of renowned international contributors are divided into four parts which look, in turn, at: history – an integrated chronological narrative of the genre’s development theory – detailed accounts of major theoretical approaches including feminism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, postcolonialism, posthumanism and utopian studies issues and challenges – anticipates future directions for study in areas as diverse as science studies, music, design, environmentalism, ethics and alterity subgenres – a prismatic view of the genre, tracing themes and developments within specific subgenres. Bringing into dialogue the many perspectives on the genre The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction is essential reading for anyone interested in the history and the future of science fiction and the way it is taught and studied.
The History of Science Fiction
Author: Adam Roberts
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137569573
Pages: 524
Year: 2016-08-04
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This book is the definitive critical history of science fiction. The 2006 first edition of this work traced the development of the genre from Ancient Greece and the European Reformation through to the end of the 20th century. This new 2nd edition has been revised thoroughly and very significantly expanded. An all-new final chapter discusses 21st-century science fiction, and there is new material in every chapter: a wealth of new readings and original research. The author’s groundbreaking thesis that science fiction is born out of the 17th-century Reformation is here bolstered with a wide range of new supporting material and many hundreds of 17th- and 18th-century science fiction texts, some of which have never been discussed before. The account of 19th-century science fiction has been expanded, and the various chapters tracing the twentieth-century bring in more writing by women, and science fiction in other media including cinema, TV, comics, fan-culture and other modes.
Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction
Author: David Seed
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199557454
Pages: 147
Year: 2011-06-23
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David Seed examines how science fiction has emerged as a popular genre of literature in the 20th century, and discusses it in relation to themes such as science and technology, space, aliens, utopias, and gender. Looking at some of the most influential writers of the genre he also considers the wider social and political issues it raises.
Critical Theory and Science Fiction
Author: Carl Freedman
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819574546
Pages: 228
Year: 2013-09-01
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Carl Freedman traces the fundamental and mostly unexamined relationships between the discourses of science fiction and critical theory, arguing that science fiction is (or ought to be) a privileged genre for critical theory. He asserts that it is no accident that the upsurge of academic interest in science fiction since the 1970s coincides with the heyday of literary theory, and that likewise science fiction is one of the most theoretically informed areas of the literary profession. Extended readings of novels by five of the most important modern science fiction authors illustrate the affinity between science fiction and critical theory, in each case concentrating on one major novel that resonates with concerns proper to critical theory. Freedman’s five readings are: Solaris: Stanislaw Lem and the Structure of Cognition; The Dispossessed: Ursula LeGuin and the Ambiguities of Utopia; The Two of Them: Joanna Russ and the Violence of Gender; Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand: Samuel Delany and the Dialectics of Difference; The Man in the High Castle: Philip K. Dick and the Construction of Realities.
Teaching Science Fiction
Author: A. Sawyer, P. Wright
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230300391
Pages: 266
Year: 2011-03-24
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Teaching Science Fiction is the first text in thirty years to explore the pedagogic potential of that most intellectually stimulating and provocative form of popular literature: science fiction. Innovative and academically lively, it offers valuable insights into how SF can be taught historically, culturally and practically at university level.
Reading Science Fiction
Author: James Gunn, Marleen Barr, Matthew Candelaria
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1137191511
Pages: 256
Year: 2008-10-28
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Reading Science Fiction brings together world class scholars and fiction writers to introduce the history, concepts and contexts necessary to understanding this fascinating genre. Providing valuable insights into the world of science-fiction, this thought-provoking textbook makes learning how to read science fiction an exciting collaborative process for teachers and students. Comprehensive and engaging, Reading Science Fiction: • Explores a wide range of theoretical approaches to studying science fiction, such as gender studies, post-colonial studies and structuralism • Maps the definitions and history of science fiction, including its origin, influences and parallel development with modern society • Introduces major science fiction writers such as Arthur C. Clarke, Joanna Russ, Octavia Butler and Kim Stanley Roberts.

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