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The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex and the Brain
Author: Judith Horstman, Scientific American
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118109538
Pages: 256
Year: 2011-11-15
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Who do we love? Who loves us? And why? Is love really a mystery, or can neuroscience offer some answers to these age-old questions? In her third enthralling book about the brain, Judith Horstman takes us on a lively tour of our most important sex and love organ and the whole smorgasbord of our many kinds of love-from the bonding of parent and child to the passion of erotic love, the affectionate love of companionship, the role of animals in our lives, and the love of God. Drawing on the latest neuroscience, she explores why and how we are born to love-how we're hardwired to crave the companionship of others, and how very badly things can go without love. Among the findings: parental love makes our brain bigger, sex and orgasm make it healthier, social isolation makes it miserable-and although the craving for romantic love can be described as an addiction, friendship may actually be the most important loving relationship of your life. Based on recent studies and articles culled from the prestigious Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, and the Brain offers a fascinating look at how the brain controls our loving relationships, most intimate moments, and our deep and basic need for connection.
Scientific American Science Desk Reference
Author: Scientific American Magazine, Scientific American
Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
ISBN: 1620457180
Pages: 704
Year: 1999-09
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Who names newly discovered planets? What exactly are black holes? Where are there the most earthquakes? When did the first Homo sapiens walk the earth? Why is the night sky dark? How does the fluoride in toothpaste prevent cavities? Since 1845, Scientific American has answered questions and provided the best information available in all areas of science. Now, Scientific American is proud to present an accessible, one-volume reference covering all the sciences. Whether you want to examine the tiniest microbes, the properties of the earth's core, or the farthest reaches of space, this handy desk reference is the resource to turn to for the answers you need. * Over 500 biographies of key science figures * Thousands of glossary terms * Hundreds of useful Web sites * Tables, charts, diagrams, and illustrations * Sidebars featuring fascinating facts, mnemonic aids, and quizzes * Essays exploring ideas in-depth
Accessory to War: The Unspoken Alliance Between Astrophysics and the Military
Author: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Avis Lang
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039328543X
Pages: 448
Year: 2018-09-11
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An exploration of the age-old complicity between skywatchers and warfighters, from the best-selling author of Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. In this fascinating foray into the centuries-old relationship between science and military power, acclaimed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and writer-researcher Avis Lang examine how the methods and tools of astrophysics have been enlisted in the service of war. "The overlap is strong, and the knowledge flows in both directions," say the authors, because astrophysicists and military planners care about many of the same things: multi-spectral detection, ranging, tracking, imaging, high ground, nuclear fusion, and access to space. Tyson and Lang call it a "curiously complicit" alliance. "The universe is both the ultimate frontier and the highest of high grounds," they write. "Shared by both space scientists and space warriors, it’s a laboratory for one and a battlefield for the other. The explorer wants to understand it; the soldier wants to dominate it. But without the right technology—which is more or less the same technology for both parties—nobody can get to it, operate in it, scrutinize it, dominate it, or use it to their advantage and someone else’s disadvantage." Spanning early celestial navigation to satellite-enabled warfare, Accessory to War is a richly researched and provocative examination of the intersection of science, technology, industry, and power that will introduce Tyson’s millions of fans to yet another dimension of how the universe has shaped our lives and our world.
The Lost Elements
Author: Marco Fontani, Mariagrazia Costa, Mary Virginia Orna
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199383340
Pages: 531
Year: 2014-10-13
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In the mid-nineteenth century, chemists came to the conclusion that elements should be organized by their atomic weights. However, the atomic weights of various elements were calculated erroneously, and chemists also observed some anomalies in the properties of other elements. Over time, it became clear that the periodic table as currently comprised contained gaps, missing elements that had yet to be discovered. A rush to discover these missing pieces followed, and a seemingly endless amount of elemental discoveries were proclaimed and brought into laboratories. It wasn't until the discovery of the atomic number in 1913 that chemists were able to begin making sense of what did and what did not belong on the periodic table, but even then, the discovery of radioactivity convoluted the definition of an element further. Throughout its formation, the periodic table has seen false entries, good-faith errors, retractions, and dead ends; in fact, there have been more elemental discoveries" that have proven false than there are current elements on the table. The Lost Elements: The Shadow Side of Discovery collects the most notable of these instances, stretching from the nineteenth century to the present. The book tells the story of how scientists have come to understand elements, by discussing the failed theories and false discoveries that shaped the path of scientific progress. Chapters range from early chemists' stubborn refusal to disregard alchemy as legitimate practice, to the effects of the atomic number on discovery, to the switch in influence from chemists to physicists, as elements began to be artificially created in the twentieth century. Along the way, Fontani, Costa, and Orna introduce us to the key figures in the development of the periodic table as we know it. And we learn, in the end, that this development was shaped by errors and gaffs as much as by correct assumptions and scientific conclusions."
Loose-leaf Version for Scientific American: Presenting Psychology
Author: Deborah Licht, Misty Hull, Coco Ballantyne
Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education
ISBN: 1319066461
Pages: 640
Year: 2016-01-07
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Presenting Psychology is a fresh, concise variation of the breakout bestseller Scientific American: Psychology, combining the communicative style of the world’s most respected science magazine with thoughtful immersive learning to help you reach all kinds of students. Authored by longtime community college instructors Deborah Licht and Misty Hull alongside science journalist, Coco Ballantyne, the text centers on profiles and video interviews of 25 real people to help students better understand, remember, and relate to psychology’s defining concepts. Chapters also feature full-page Scientific American-style infographics which guide students through essential, often complex concepts step by step.
The Scientific American Book of Dinosaurs
Author: Gregory Paul
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0312310080
Pages: 432
Year: 2003-04-22
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Collects writings by experts in paleontology, from John Horner on dinosaur families to Robert Bakker on the latest wave of fossil discoveries.
Infested
Author: Brooke Borel
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022604193X
Pages: 259
Year: 2015-04-08
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A biological and cultural history of the bed bug explores ongoing scientific discoveries, the advent of DDT, the flourishing emergence of current infestations, the economics of bed bug problems and the ways that bed bugs have inspired art.
Through Two Doors at Once
Author: Anil Ananthaswamy
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101986115
Pages: 304
Year: 2018-08-07
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The intellectual adventure story of the "double-slit" experiment, showing how a sunbeam split into two paths first challenged our understanding of light and then the nature of reality itself--and continues to almost 200 years later. Many of the greatest scientific minds have grappled with this experiment. Thomas Young devised it in the early 1800s to show that light behaves like a wave, and in doing so opposed Isaac Newton's view that light is made of particles. But then Albert Einstein showed that light comes in quanta, or particles. Quantum mechanics was born. This led to a fierce debate between Einstein and Niels Bohr over the nature of reality--subatomic bits of matter and its interaction with light--again as revealed by the double-slit experiment. Richard Feynman held that it embodies the central mystery of the quantum world. Decade after decade, hypothesis after hypothesis, scientists have returned to this ingenious experiment to help them answer deeper and deeper questions about the fabric of the universe. How can a single particle behave both like a particle and a wave? Does a particle, or indeed reality, exist before we look at it, or does looking create reality, as the textbook "Copenhagen interpretation" of quantum mechanics seems to suggest? How can particles influence each other faster than the speed of light? Is there a place where the quantum world ends and the familiar classical world of our daily lives begins, and if so, can we find it? And if there's no such place, then does the universe split into two each time a particle goes through the double-slit? Through Two Doors at Once celebrates the elegant simplicity of an iconic experiment and its profound reach. With his extraordinarily gifted eloquence, Anil Ananthaswamy travels around the world, through history and down to the smallest scales of physical reality we have yet fathomed. It is the most fantastic voyage you can take.
Dragonflies
Author: Pieter Van Dokkum
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030019708X
Pages: 176
Year: 2015-01-03
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A gorgeous tribute to the magic and mystique of dragonflies, with intimate photographs of their entire life cycle
Smart People Don't Diet
Author: Charlotte N. Markey
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1458798747
Pages:
Year: 2015-02-11
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Being on a diet is a miserable experience for most people, and it rarely leads to the desired goal of shedding fat. In fact, studies show that dieters often gain weight rather than lose it, because the intensity, restrictions, and short duration of most diets means they are ill - equipped to produce long - term effects. In Smart People Don't Diet, Dr Charlotte N. Markey presents a refreshingly different perspective, addressing the underlying causes of weight gain and offering proven strategies for lasting weight management. This book will show you how to eat well, lose weight, and keep it off - without dieting. The gimmicks don't work, but Dr Markey's reasonable, accessible advice will help you get - and stay - healthy.
Home
Author: John Allen, S Allen
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465073891
Pages: 304
Year: 2015-12-29
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Home is where the heart is. Security, comfort, even love, are all feelings that are centered on the humble abode. But what if there is more to the feeling of being at home? Neuroanthropologist John S. Allen believes that the human habitat is one of the most important products of human cognitive, technological, and cultural evolution over the past two million years. In Home, Allen argues that to "feel at home" is more than just an expression, but reflects a deep-seated cognitive basis for the human desire to have, use, and enjoy a place of one's own. Allen addresses the very basic question: How did a place to sleep become a home? Within human evolution, he ranks house and home as a signature development of our species, as it emerged alongside cooperative hunting, language, and other critical aspects of humanity. Many animals burrow, making permanent home bases, but primates, generally speaking, do not: most wander, making nests at night wherever they might find themselves. This is often in home territory, but it isn’t quite home. Our hominid ancestors were wanderers, too—so how did we, over the past several million years, find our way home? To tell that story Allen will take us through evolutionary anthropology, neuroscience, the study of emotion, and modern sociology. He examines the home from the inside (of our heads) out: homes are built with our brains as much as with our hands and tools. Allen argues that the thing that may have been most critical in our evolution is not the physical aspect of a home, but developing a feeling of defining, creating, and being in a home, whatever its physical form. The result was an environment, relatively secure against whatever horrors lurked outside, that enabled the expensive but creative human mind to reach its full flowering. Today, with the threat of homelessness, child foster-care, and foreclosure, this idea of having a home is more powerful than ever. In a clear and accessible writing style, Allen sheds light on the deep, cognitive sources of the pleasures of having a home, the evolution of those behaviors, and why the deep reasons why they matter. Home is the story about how humans evolved to create a space not only for shelter, but also for nurturing creativity, innovation, and culture—and why “feeling at home” is a fundamental aspect of the human condition.
Viruses
Author: Arnold Jay Levine
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0716750317
Pages: 240
Year: 1992
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Discusses the enormous scientific and medical contributions that have come from the field of virology.
Reinventing Discovery
Author: Michael Nielsen
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691148902
Pages: 264
Year: 2012
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"Reinventing Discovery argues that we are in the early days of the most dramatic change in how science is done in more than 300 years. This change is being driven by new online tools, which are transforming and radically accelerating scientific discovery"--Provided by publisher.
The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain
Author: Judith Horstman, Scientific American
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470500514
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-08-13
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Have you ever wondered what’s happening in your brain as you go through a typical day and night? This fascinating book presents an hour-by-hour round-the-clock journal of your brain’s activities. Drawing on the treasure trove of information from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines as well as original material written specifically for this book, Judith Horstman weaves together a compelling description of your brain at work and at play. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain reveals what’s going on in there while you sleep and dream, how your brain makes memories and forms addictions and why we sometimes make bad decisions. The book also offers intriguing information about your emotional brain, and what’s happening when you’re feeling love, lust, fear and anxiety—and how sex, drugs and rock and roll tickle the same spots. Based on the latest scientific information, the book explores your brain’s remarkable ability to change, how your brain can make new neurons even into old age and why multitasking may be bad for you. Your brain is uniquely yours – but research is showing many of its day-to-day cycles are universal. This book gives you a look inside your brain and some insights into why you may feel and act as you do. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain is written in the entertaining, informative and easy-to-understand style that fans of Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazine have come to expect.
The Biosphere
Author: Vladimir I. Vernadsky
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461217504
Pages: 178
Year: 2012-12-06
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"Vladimir Vernadsky was a brilliant and prescient scholar-a true scientific visionary who saw the deep connections between life on Earth and the rest of the planet and understood the profound implications for life as a cosmic phenomenon." -DAVID H. GRINSPOON, AUTHOR OF VENUS REVEALED "The Biosphere should be required reading for all entry level students in earth and planetary sciences." -ERIC D. SCHNEIDER, AUTHOR OF INTO THE COOL: THE NEW THERMODYNAMICS OF CREATIVE DESTRUCTION