Passing On The Right Conservative Professors In The Progressive University Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Passing on the Right
Author: Jon A. Shields, Joshua M. Dunn
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199863059
Pages: 256
Year: 2016-03-30
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Few seem to think conservatives should become professors. While the left fears an invasion of their citadel by conservatives marching to orders from the Koch brothers, the right steers young conservatives away from a professorial vocation by lampooning its leftism. Shields and Dunn quiet these fears by shedding light on the hidden world of conservative professors through 153 interviews. Most conservative professors told them that the university is a far more tolerant place than its right-wing critics imagine. Many, in fact, first turned right in the university itself, while others say they feel more at home in academia than in the Republican Party. Even so, being a conservative in the progressive university can be challenging. Many professors admit to closeting themselves prior to tenure by passing as liberals. Some openly conservative professors even say they were badly mistreated on account of their politics, especially those who ventured into politicized disciplines or expressed culturally conservative views. Despite real challenges, the many successful professors interviewed by Shields and Dunn show that conservatives can survive and sometimes thrive in one of America's most progressive professions. And this means that liberals and conservatives need to rethink the place of conservatives in academia. Liberals should take the high road by becoming more principled advocates of diversity, especially since conservative professors are rarely close-minded or combatants in a right-wing war against the university. Movement conservatives, meanwhile, should de-escalate its polemical war against the university, especially since it inadvertently helps cement progressives' troubled rule over academia.
Passing on the Right
Author: Jon A. Shields, Joshua M. Dunn Sr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199860254
Pages:
Year: 2016-02-29
View: 161
Read: 585
Few seem to think conservatives should become professors. While the left fears an invasion of their citadel by conservatives marching to orders from the Koch brothers, the right steers young conservatives away from a professorial vocation by lampooning its leftism. Shields and Dunn quiet these fears by shedding light on the hidden world of conservative professors through 153 interviews. Most conservative professors told them that the university is a far more tolerant place than its right-wing critics imagine. Many, in fact, first turned right in the university itself, while others say they feel more at home in academia than in the Republican Party. Even so, being a conservative in the progressive university can be challenging. Many professors admit to closeting themselves prior to tenure by passing as liberals. Some openly conservative professors even say they were badly mistreated on account of their politics, especially those who ventured into politicized disciplines or expressed culturally conservative views. Despite real challenges, the many successful professors interviewed by Shields and Dunn show that conservatives can survive and sometimes thrive in one of America's most progressive professions. And this means that liberals and conservatives need to rethink the place of conservatives in academia. Liberals should take the high road by becoming more principled advocates of diversity, especially since conservative professors are rarely close-minded or combatants in a right-wing war against the university. Movement conservatives, meanwhile, should de-escalate its polemical war against the university, especially since it inadvertently helps cement progressives' troubled rule over academia.
Passing on the Right
Author: Jon A. Shields, Joshua M. Dunn Sr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199863067
Pages: 288
Year: 2016-02-29
View: 854
Read: 590
Few seem to think conservatives should become professors. While the left fears an invasion of their citadel by conservatives marching to orders from the Koch brothers, the right steers young conservatives away from a professorial vocation by lampooning its leftism. Shields and Dunn quiet these fears by shedding light on the hidden world of conservative professors through 153 interviews. Most conservative professors told them that the university is a far more tolerant place than its right-wing critics imagine. Many, in fact, first turned right in the university itself, while others say they feel more at home in academia than in the Republican Party. Even so, being a conservative in the progressive university can be challenging. Many professors admit to closeting themselves prior to tenure by passing as liberals. Some openly conservative professors even say they were badly mistreated on account of their politics, especially those who ventured into politicized disciplines or expressed culturally conservative views. Despite real challenges, the many successful professors interviewed by Shields and Dunn show that conservatives can survive and sometimes thrive in one of America's most progressive professions. And this means that liberals and conservatives need to rethink the place of conservatives in academia. Liberals should take the high road by becoming more principled advocates of diversity, especially since conservative professors are rarely close-minded or combatants in a right-wing war against the university. Movement conservatives, meanwhile, should de-escalate its polemical war against the university, especially since it inadvertently helps cement progressives' troubled rule over academia.
Why Are Professors Liberal and Why Do Conservatives Care?
Author: Neil Gross
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674074483
Pages: 400
Year: 2013-04-09
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Neil Gross shows that the U.S. academy’s liberal reputation has exerted a self-selecting influence on young liberals, while deterring promising conservatives. His study sheds new light on both academic life and American politics, where the conservative movement was built in part around opposition to the “liberal elite” in higher education.
Becoming Right
Author: Amy J. Binder, Kate Wood
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691145377
Pages: 399
Year: 2013
View: 164
Read: 316
""Becoming Right" vividly illustrates how conservative students experience the university--and how these experiences differ by campus. This beautifully written book is a must read for anyone who seeks to understand the political socialization of conservative leaders and the sources of cleavages within contemporary conservative politics. Appealing to a wide audience, this is a powerful and original approach to the analysis of undergraduate life."--Elizabeth Armstrong, University of Michigan "Social scientists have paid surprisingly little attention to conservative college students. "Becoming Right" remedies this with a penetrating analysis of the diverse political styles that can be found among students on the right, and of the campus settings that foster them. This important contribution to political sociology and the sociology of higher education has lessons to teach all readers about the complexity of the conservative movement and the passions of conservative collegians."--Neil Gross, University of British Columbia "Offering a fascinating and nuanced portrait of young conservatives and their political commitments, Binder and Wood provide invaluable insight into this important but overlooked segment of American politics. Their analysis also illuminates the ways in which universities shape political identity and behavior, and is certain to stimulate new inquiries into the formation of political culture."--Julie A. Reuben, Harvard University "The rise of conservatism on campus has been a central priority of well-funded think tanks and advocacy groups in their efforts to keep the pipeline full of potential leaders for each new generation. This splendid study of the contemporary campus right fills a huge gap in the public's understanding of the most recent wave of conservative cadre building."--Paul J. DiMaggio, Princeton University ""Becoming Right" marshals novel, nuanced material to depict styles of conservative political organization at two U.S. universities. The big finding is that organizational context matters--a lot--for how undergraduates come to think of themselves as political subjects, how they act and react toward their campuses, and how they imagine their own futures. This book clearly demonstrates that political actors are made, not born."--Mitchell L. Stevens, Stanford University
Professors and Their Politics
Author: Neil Gross, Solon Simmons
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421413353
Pages: 376
Year: 2014-07-10
View: 403
Read: 218
Professors and Their Politics tackles the assumption that universities are ivory towers of radicalism with the potential to corrupt conservative youth. Neil Gross and Solon Simmons gather the work of leading sociologists, historians, and other researchers interested in the relationship between politics and higher education to present evidence to the contrary. In eleven meaty chapters, contributors describe the political makeup of American academia today, consider the causes of its liberal tilt, discuss the college experience for politically conservative students, and delve into historical debates about professorial politics. Offering readable, rigorous analyses rather than polemics, Professors and Their Politics yields important new insights into the nature of higher education institutions while challenging dogmas of both the left and the right. -- Jack H. Schuster, Claremont Graduate University
Choosing the Right College 2014–15
Author: John Zmirak
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 148049299X
Pages: 992
Year: 2014-03-11
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“By far the best college guide, for both its honesty and its insights.” —Thomas Sowell Over the past decade, Choosing the Right College has established itself as the indispensable resource for students—and parents—who want the unvarnished truth about America’s top colleges and universities. It is the most in-depth, independently researched college guide on the market, using on-campus sources to turn up the best—and worst—aspects of nearly 150 schools. Just as important, Choosing the Right College covers the intellectual, political, and social conditions that really matter, including: · The integrity and rigor of the curriculum · Which courses and professors to take—and which to avoid · The prevalence of politics in the classroom and the state of free speech—all highlighted with ISI’s unique “traffic light” · Living arrangements, safety, and other keys to student life · How to get a real education at any school Beyond all that, this brand-new edition of Choosing the Right College features a host of innovations, including: “So You’re Looking For...,” top-five lists of colleges for all types of students; a quick list of each school’s strengths and weaknesses; an insider’s look at the pros and cons of online education; and more. This new edition of Choosing the Right College also provides the financial information families need in this age of soaring tuition. What are the most overpriced colleges—and which are relatively good values? What is the average student-debt load? To cap it all off, Choosing the Right College introduces the groundbreaking feature “Blue Collar Ivies”—in-depth reports on the best affordable colleges in all fifty states. Choosing the Right College 2014–15 will completely change the way young people make a life-altering decision.
The Still Divided Academy
Author: Stanley Rothman, April Kelly-Woessner, Matthew Woessner
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1442208082
Pages: 296
Year: 2010-12-16
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Drawing on data collected in a specially commissioned public opinion survey as well as other recent research on higher education, Rothman, Kelly-Woessner, and Woessner, create an incredibly readable presentation of both the similarities and differences between those running our universities and those attending them. The authors manage to remain impressively neutral; instead they give us a fuller perspective of the people on our college campuses.
The Righteous Mind
Author: Jonathan Haidt
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307455777
Pages: 500
Year: 2013
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Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.
The Professors
Author: David Horowitz
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1621571041
Pages: 248
Year: 2013-02-05
View: 220
Read: 431
A book to challenge the status quo, spark a debate, and get people talking about the issues and questions we face as a country!
A House Full of Daughters
Author: Juliet Nicolson
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 0374715327
Pages: 336
Year: 2016-06-14
View: 176
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A family memoir that traces the myths, legends, and secrets of seven generations of remarkable women All families have their myths and legends. For many years Juliet Nicolson accepted hers--the dangerous beauty of her flamenco dancing great-great-grandmother Pepita, the flirty manipulation of her great-grandmother Victoria, the infamous eccentricity of her grandmother Vita Sackville-West, her mother’s Tory-conventional background. But then Juliet, a distinguished historian, started to question. As she did so, she sifted fact from fiction, uncovering details and secrets long held just out of sight. A House Full of Daughters takes us through seven generations of women. In the nineteenth-century slums of Malaga, the salons of fin-de-siecle Washington D.C., an English boarding school during the Second World War, Chelsea in the 1960s, the knife-edge that was New York City in the 1980s, these women emerge for Juliet as people in their own right, but also as part of who she is and where she has come from. A House Full of Daughters is one woman’s investigation into the nature of family, memory, and the past. As Juliet finds uncomfortable patterns reflected in these distant and more recent versions of herself, she realizes her challenge is to embrace the good and reject the hazards that have trapped past generations.
Liberalism Is a Mental Disorder
Author: Michael Savage
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
ISBN: 1418569011
Pages: 256
Year: 2006-03-05
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Liberalism Is a Mental Disorder- Michael Savage has the cure. With grit, guts, and gusto, talk radio sensation Michael Savage leaves no political turn unstoned as he savages today's most rabid liberalism. In this paperback edition of his third New York Times bestseller, Savage strikes at the root of today's most pressing issues, including: Homeland security: "We need more Patton and less patent leather . . . Real homeland security begins when we arrest, interrogate, jail, or deport known operatives within our own borders . . . One dirty bomb can ruin your whole day." Illegal immigration: "I envision an Oil for Illegals program . . . The president should demand one barrel of oil from Mexico for every illegal that sneaks into our country." Lawsuit abuse: "Lawyers are like red wine. Everything in moderation. Today we have far too many lawyers, and we're suffering from cirrhosis of the economy." "Pure Savage. Very effective, very timely, very hot." American Compass Book Club
God and Man at Yale
Author: William F. Buckley
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1596988037
Pages: 240
Year: 2012-02-06
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“For God, for country, and for Yale…in that order,” William F. Buckley Jr. wrote as the dedication of his monumental work—a compendium of knowledge that still resonates within the halls of the Ivy League university that tried to cover up its political and religious bias. Buckley’s harsh assessment of his alma mater divulged the reality behind the institution’s wholly secular education, even within the religion department and divinity school. Unabashed, one former Yale student details the importance of Christianity and heralds the modern conservative movement in his preeminent tell-all, God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of “Academic Freedom.”
Presidential Selection
Author: James W. Ceaser
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691021880
Pages: 371
Year: 1979
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Examining the development of the process of presidential selection from the founding of the republic to the present day, James Ceaser contends that many of the major purposes of the selection system as it was formerly understood have been ignored by current reformers and modern scholars. In an attempt to reverse this trend, Professor Ceaser discusses the theories of selection offered by leading American statesmen from the Founders and Thomas Jefferson to Martin Van Buren and Woodrow Wilson. From these theories he identifies a set of criteria for a sound selection system that he then uses to analyze and evaluate the recent changes in the selection process. Five normative functions of a presidential selection system comprise the author's criteria: it should minimize the harmful effects of ambitious contenders for the office, promote responsible executive leadership and power, help secure an able president, ensure a legitimate accession, and provide for an appropriate amount of choice and change. Professor Ceaser finds that the present system is characterized by weak parties and candidate-centered campaigns that lead to the problems of "image" politics and demagogic leadership appeals. He therefore argues for a more republican selection system in which political parties would be strengthened to serve as a restraining force on popular authority, public opinion, and individual aspirations for executive power.
Illiberal Reformers
Author: Thomas C. Leonard
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400874076
Pages: 264
Year: 2016-01-12
View: 259
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In Illiberal Reformers, Thomas Leonard reexamines the economic progressives whose ideas and reform agenda underwrote the Progressive Era dismantling of laissez-faire and the creation of the regulatory welfare state, which, they believed, would humanize and rationalize industrial capitalism. But not for all. Academic social scientists such as Richard T. Ely, John R. Commons, and Edward A. Ross, together with their reform allies in social work, charity, journalism, and law, played a pivotal role in establishing minimum-wage and maximum-hours laws, workmen's compensation, antitrust regulation, and other hallmarks of the regulatory welfare state. But even as they offered uplift to some, economic progressives advocated exclusion for others, and did both in the name of progress. Leonard meticulously reconstructs the influence of Darwinism, racial science, and eugenics on scholars and activists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing a reform community deeply ambivalent about America's poor. Illiberal Reformers shows that the intellectual champions of the regulatory welfare state proposed using it not to help those they portrayed as hereditary inferiors but to exclude them.

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