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Dependency Culture
Author: Hartley Dean, Peter Taylor-Gooby
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317866959
Pages: 232
Year: 2014-05-22
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First published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
From a Culture of Dependency to a Culture of Success
Author: Y. S. Wishnick
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1465393331
Pages: 250
Year: 2011-11
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There is an old story of a famous business tycoon that was near death. His lifelong business partner approached him on his deathbed and asked if he'd like to see his great grandchild. The business executive opened his eyes and whispered in his associate's ear, No, my friend, I do not want to know what I've missed. More and more Americans are missing out on the greatness of their country; its passion for excellence, its commitment to the dignity and self-worth of each individual, and its belief that every person has the right to achieve their own vision for success. Chaos, confusion, disappointment, and hopelessness have pushed and pulled Americans into a state of dependency. From the individual, to the family, to our local communities, Americans are constantly looking for others to solve the problems and challenges they face. This has lead to victimology, class warfare, and ultimately bad public policy where a culture of dependency is becoming the new normal. As people think themselves into believing that they can't make it on their own they are rejecting their own potential and capacity to act. Worse, they are missing out on the person they were destined to become.
Beyond the Dependency Culture
Author: James Robertson
Publisher:
ISBN: 0744901391
Pages: 217
Year: 1997-12-31
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Twentieth-century capitalism and socialism propped each other up. Both belonged to the modern industrialized period of human history when the powerful interest groups of business and state dominated people, and Euro-American culture and power dominated the world. An emerging post-modern worldview foreshadows possibilities for a new path of progress, more deeply concerned for people and nature. Based on articles and lectures, this collection explores what this new path of progress could mean for politics, work, welfare, health, energy, the life of families and neighborhoods, the world role of today's rich countries, and other aspects of the human predicament today.
Feeding Japan
Author: Andreas Niehaus, Tine Walravens
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 331950553X
Pages: 540
Year: 2017-06-27
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This edited collection explores the historical dimensions, cultural practices, socio-economic mechanisms and political agendas that shape the notion of a national cuisine inside and outside of Japan. Japanese food is often perceived as pure, natural, healthy and timeless, and these words not only fuel a hype surrounding Japanese food and lifestyle worldwide, but also a domestic retro-movement that finds health and authenticity in ‘traditional’ ingredients, dishes and foodways. The authors in this volume bring together research from the fields of history, cultural and religious studies, food studies as well as political science and international relations, and aim to shed light on relevant aspects of culinary nationalism in Japan while unearthing the underlying patterns and processes in the construction of food identities.
From a Culture of Dependency to a Culture of Success
Author: Y.S. Wishnick
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 146539334X
Pages: 248
Year: 2011-11-23
View: 914
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There is an old story of a famous business tycoon that was near death. His lifelong business partner approached him on his deathbed and asked if hed like to see his great grandchild. The business executive opened his eyes and whispered in his associates ear, No, my friend, I do not want to know what Ive missed. More and more Americans are missing out on the greatness of their country; its passion for excellence, its commitment to the dignity and self-worth of each individual, and its belief that every person has the right to achieve their own vision for success. Chaos, confusion, disappointment, and hopelessness have pushed and pulled Americans into a state of dependency. From the individual, to the family, to our local communities, Americans are constantly looking for others to solve the problems and challenges they face. This has lead to victimology, class warfare, and ultimately bad public policy where a culture of dependency is becoming the new normal. As people think themselves into believing that they cant make it on their own they are rejecting their own potential and capacity to act. Worse, they are missing out on the person they were destined to become.
Dependency Culture
Author: Hartley Dean, Peter Taylor-Gooby
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0745012264
Pages: 217
Year: 1992
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First published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Poverty
Author: Paul Spicker, Sonia Alverez Leguizamon, David Gordon
Publisher: Zed Books
ISBN: 1842778234
Pages: 246
Year: 2007-02-15
View: 544
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A limited number of definitions have dominated academic and political discourse and poverty understanding over the last few decades. The aim of this "glossary" is to widen the choice of definitions available, thereby expanding the scientific field of poverty research so it gets closer to the complex reality of poverty and the lives of poor people. This book has over 200 definitions and explanations of terms used with poverty.--[from book].
Culture, Communication, and National Identity
Author: Richard Collins
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 0802067727
Pages: 367
Year: 1990
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?There can be no political sovereignty without culture sovereignty.? So argued the CBC in 1985 in its evidence to the Caplan/Sauvageau Task Force on Broadcasting Policy. Richard Collins challenges this assumption. He argues in this study of nationalism and Canadian television policy that Canada?s political sovereignty depends much less on Canadian content in television than has generally been accepted. His analysis focuses on television drama, at the centre of television policy in the 1980s. Collins questions the conventional image of Canada as a weak national entity undermined by its population?s predilection for foreign television. Rather, he argues, Canada is held together, not by a shared repertoire of symbols, a national culture, but by other social forces, notably political institutions. Collins maintains that important advantages actually and potentially flow from Canada?s wear national symbolic culture. Rethinking the relationships between television and society in Canada may yield a more successful broadcasting policy, more popular television programming, and a better understanding of the links between culture and the body politic. As the European Community moves closer to political unity, the Canadian case may become more relevant to Europe, which, Collins suggests, already fears the ?Canadianization? of its television. He maintains that a European multilingual society, without a shared culture or common European audio-visual sphere and with viewers watching foreign television, can survive successfully as a political entity ? just as Canada has.
Oil and American Identity
Author: Sebastian Herbstreuth
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857738380
Pages: 280
Year: 2014-09-10
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American dependence on foreign oil has long been described as a serious threat to U.S. national security, and continues to be a political flashpoint even as domestic fracking eases the US’ reliance on imported energy. Oil and American Identity offers a fresh perspective on the subject by reframing ‘energy dependency’ as a cultural discourse with intimate connections to American views on independence, freedom, consumption, abundance, progress and American exceptionalism. Through a detailed reading of primary literature, Sebastian Herbstreuth also shows how the dangers of foreign oil are linked to American descriptions of foreign oil producers as culturally different und thus ‘undependable’. Herbstreuth shows how even reliable imports from the Middle East are portrayed as dangerous and undesirable because this region is particularly ‘foreign’ from an American point of view, while oil from friendly countries like Canada is cast as a benign form of energy trade. Oil and American Identity rewrites the history of U.S. foreign oil dependence as a cultural history of the United States in the 20th century.
We Are Not the Hero
Author: Jean Johnson
Publisher:
ISBN: 1937756459
Pages: 335
Year: 2012-10-01
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While globalization gives North American Christians unprecedented opportunities to influence the world, we need to take care not to slip into a type of postmodern colonialism in which we make ourselves the experts or the "hero come to save the day." We need to intentionally guide others to look to God and to their own communities for resources, solutions, creativity, ingenuity, hard work, and interdependence, instead of making them perpetual recipients of all the good things we can do for them. Johnson shares lessons learned from her sixteen years in Cambodia, in an area known as the Killing Fields.
Dependency and Japanese Socialization
Author: Frank A. Johnson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081474222X
Pages: 472
Year: 1995-01-01
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"Surprisingly readable and studded with nuggets of insight." —The Daily Yomiuri "This insightful, well-written, fascinating book offers new understandings, not only of Japan, but also of American culture. It is essential for those in anthropology, psychology, sociology, and psychiatry who are interested in culture, as well as those in law and the business community who deal with Japan." —Paul Ekman, Ph.D.,Director, Human Interaction Laboratory, Langley Porter Institute, University of California, San Francisco "[A] thoughtful cross-cultural study of development...His work can only enhance the still evolving psychoanalytic theory of preoedipal development as it is being derived mostly from psychoanalytic research on child-parent interaction in American families." —Calvin F. Settlage, M.D. "Johnson's ambitious and exhaustive synthesis of anthropological and psychological treatments of dependency raises interesting questions. . . Johnson alerts the reader to issues of universalism and relativity and leads us to ask, 'What would psychoanalysis be like, if it had originated in Japan?'" —Merry I. White, Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University ". . . Johnson's erudite and critical re-examination of human dependence succeeds to re-profile dependence meaningfully and revives our interest in this major aspect of human experience. Indeed, much food for thought for both psychoanalysts and anthropologists." —Henri Parens, M.D., Philadelphia Psychoanalytic Institute Western ideologies traditionally emphasize the concepts of individualism, privacy, freedom, and independence, while the prevailing ethos relegates dependency to a disparaged status. In Japanese society, the divergence from these western ideals can be found in the concept of amae (perhaps best translated as indulgent dependency) which is part of the Japanese social fiber and pervades their experience. For the Western reader, the concept of amae is somewhat alien and unfamiliar, but in order to understand the Japanese fully, it is essential to acquire a familiarity with the intensity that accompanies interdependent affiliations within their culture. To place amae in the proper context, Johnson critically examines the western attitudes toward dependency from the perspectives of psychoanalysis, psychiatry, developmental psychology, and anthropology. Johnson traces the development of the concept and uses of the term dependency in academic and developmental psychology in the West, including its recent eclipse by more operationally useful terms attachment and interdependency. This timely books makes use of the work of Japanese psychiatrist Takeo Doi, whose book The Anatomy of Dependence introduced the concept of amae to the West. Johnson goes on to illuminate the collective manner in which Japanese think and behave which is central to their socialization and educational practices, especially as seen in the stunning success of Japanese trading practices during the past twenty years. A major emphasis is placed upon the positive aspects of amae, which are compared and contrasted with attitudes toward dependency seen among other nationalities, cultures, and groups in both Western and Asian societies. Complete with a glossary of Japanese terms, Dependency and Japanese Socialization provides a comprehensive investigation into Japanese behavior.
Dependency: Dependence, Independence and Interdependence in Culture and Society
Author:
Publisher: CTPI (Edinburgh)
ISBN:
Pages:
Year:
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Culture, communication, and dependency
Author: William H. Melody, Liora Salter, Paul Heyer
Publisher: Ablex Pub
ISBN:
Pages: 264
Year: 1981
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Are Child Social Grants Creating Dependency Culture Among Beneficiaries?
Author: Priscilla Gutura
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 328
Year: 2011
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Dances with Dependency
Author: Calvin Helin
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497638879
Pages: 417
Year: 2014-07-01
View: 1309
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Dances with Dependency offers effective strategies to eliminate welfare dependency and help eradicate poverty among indigenous populations. Beginning with an impassioned and insightful portrait of today’s native communities, it connects the prevailing impoverishment and despair directly to a “dependency mindset” forged by welfare economics. To reframe this debilitating mindset, it advocates policy reform in conjunction with a return to native peoples’ ten-thousand-year tradition of self-reliance based on personal responsibility and cultural awareness. Author Calvin Helin, un-tethered to agendas of political correctness or partisan politics, describes the mounting crisis as an impending demographic tsunami threatening both the United States and Canada. In the United States, where government entitlement programs for diverse ethnic minorities coexist with an already huge national debt, he shows how prosperity is obviously at stake. This looming demographic tidal wave viewed constructively, however, can become an opportunity for reform—among not only indigenous peoples of North America but any impoverished population struggling with dependency in inner cities, developing nations, and post-totalitarian countries.

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