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My Name Is Chellis and I'm in Recovery from Western Civilization
Author: Chellis Glendinning
Publisher:
ISBN: 1897408056
Pages: 240
Year: 2007
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When it came out in 1994, "My Name is Chellis and I'm in Recovery from Western Civilization" quickly became a classic of the ecopsychology movement. By documenting the entanglement of the ecological crisis with modern addictions, the book gives an unusual glimpse into matters of culture, history, politics, and personal consciousness.
Forgotten Civilization
Author: Robert M. Schoch
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1594775125
Pages: 384
Year: 2012-08-10
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Scientific confirmation of advanced civilization at the end of the last ice age, the solar catastrophe that destroyed it, and what the evidence means for our future • Demonstrates, based on the 12,000-year-old megalithic complex of Göbekli Tepe, that advanced civilization extends thousands of years further back than generally acknowledged • Examines the catastrophic solar outbursts that ended the last ice age, wiping out antediluvian civilization and incinerating much of the evidence of that period • Reveals data that show solar outbursts powerful enough to devastate modern society could return in the future Building upon his revolutionary theory that the Sphinx dates back much further than 2500 BCE, geologist Robert Schoch reveals scientific evidence of advanced civilization predating ancient Egypt, Sumeria, and Greece, as well as the catastrophe that destroyed it nearly 12,000 years ago and what its legacy can teach us about our own future. Combining evidence from multiple scientific disciplines, Schoch shows how the last ice age ended abruptly in 9700 BCE due to coronal mass ejections from the Sun. These solar outbursts unleashed electrical/plasma discharges upon Earth and triggered volcanic activity, earthquakes, fires, and massive floods as glaciers melted and lightning strikes released torrential rains from the oceans. He explains how these events eradicated the civilization of the time and set humanity back thousands of years, only to reemerge around 3500 BCE with scattered memories and nascent abilities. He explores within this framework, how many megalithic monuments, underground cities, and ancient legends fall logically into place, as well as the reinterpreted Easter Island rongorongo texts and the intentional burial, 10,000 years ago, of the Göbekli Tepe complex in Turkey. Schoch reveals scientific evidence that shows how history could repeat itself with a coronal mass ejection powerful enough to devastate modern society. Weaving together a new view of the origins of civilization, the truths behind ancient wisdom, and the dynamics of the planet we live on, Schoch maintains we must heed the megalithic warning of the past and collectively prepare for future events.
The Eastern Origins of Western Civilisation
Author: John M. Hobson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521547245
Pages: 376
Year: 2004-06-03
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This book challenges the ethnocentric bias of mainstream accounts of the 'Rise of the West'. John Hobson argues that these accounts assume that Europeans have pioneered their own development, and that the East has been a passive by-stander. In contrast Hobson describes the rise of what he calls the 'Oriental West'. He argues that Europe first assimilated many Eastern inventions, and then appropriated Eastern resources through imperialism. Hobson's book thus propels the hitherto marginalised Eastern peoples to the forefront of the story of progressive world history.
Civilization
Author: Niall Ferguson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143122061
Pages: 402
Year: 2012
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A history of Western civilization's rise to global dominance offers insight into the development of such concepts as competition, modern medicine, and the work ethic, arguing that Western dominance is being lost to cultures who are more productively utilizing Western techniques.
Dirt
Author: David R. Montgomery
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520952111
Pages: 296
Year: 2012-04-10
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Dirt, soil, call it what you want—it's everywhere we go. It is the root of our existence, supporting our feet, our farms, our cities. This fascinating yet disquieting book finds, however, that we are running out of dirt, and it's no laughing matter. An engaging natural and cultural history of soil that sweeps from ancient civilizations to modern times, Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations explores the compelling idea that we are—and have long been—using up Earth's soil. Once bare of protective vegetation and exposed to wind and rain, cultivated soils erode bit by bit, slowly enough to be ignored in a single lifetime but fast enough over centuries to limit the lifespan of civilizations. A rich mix of history, archaeology and geology, Dirt traces the role of soil use and abuse in the history of Mesopotamia, Ancient Greece, the Roman Empire, China, European colonialism, Central America, and the American push westward. We see how soil has shaped us and we have shaped soil—as society after society has risen, prospered, and plowed through a natural endowment of fertile dirt. David R. Montgomery sees in the recent rise of organic and no-till farming the hope for a new agricultural revolution that might help us avoid the fate of previous civilizations.
Civilization One
Author: Christopher Knight, Alan Butler
Publisher: Watkins Media Limited
ISBN: 1780282273
Pages: 272
Year: 2014-03-04
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This is the amazing story of how a quest to try to crack the mystery of the Megalithic Yard—an ancient unit of linear measurement— led to the discovery of compelling evidence pointing to the existence of an unknown, highly advanced culture which was the precursor to the earliest known civilizations such as the Sumerians and the Egyptians. There must have been a “civilization one.” Knight and Butler reveal the secrets of an extraordinary, integrated measuring system which might have been lost to the world for ever. It was a system, far more advanced than anything used today, which forms the basis of both the Imperial and Metric measure systems. These ancient scientists understood the dimensions, motions and relationships of the Earth, Moon and Sun—they measured the solar system and even understood how the speed of light was integrated into the movements of our planet. Their conclusions fly in the face of everything that we thought we knew about the origins of the modern world—but the evidence is incontrovertible. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Energy and Civilization
Author: Vaclav Smil
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262338319
Pages: 568
Year: 2017-05-12
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"I wait for new Smil books the way some people wait for the next 'Star Wars' movie. In his latest book, Energy and Civilization: A History, he goes deep and broad to explain how innovations in humans' ability to turn energy into heat, light, and motion have been a driving force behind our cultural and economic progress over the past 10,000 years. -- Bill Gates, Gates Notes, Best Books of the Year Energy is the only universal currency; it is necessary for getting anything done. The conversion of energy on Earth ranges from terra-forming forces of plate tectonics to cumulative erosive effects of raindrops. Life on Earth depends on the photosynthetic conversion of solar energy into plant biomass. Humans have come to rely on many more energy flows -- ranging from fossil fuels to photovoltaic generation of electricity -- for their civilized existence. In this monumental history, Vaclav Smil provides a comprehensive account of how energy has shaped society, from pre-agricultural foraging societies through today's fossil fuel--driven civilization. Humans are the only species that can systematically harness energies outside their bodies, using the power of their intellect and an enormous variety of artifacts -- from the simplest tools to internal combustion engines and nuclear reactors. The epochal transition to fossil fuels affected everything: agriculture, industry, transportation, weapons, communication, economics, urbanization, quality of life, politics, and the environment. Smil describes humanity's energy eras in panoramic and interdisciplinary fashion, offering readers a magisterial overview. This book is an extensively updated and expanded version of Smil's Energy in World History (1994). Smil has incorporated an enormous amount of new material, reflecting the dramatic developments in energy studies over the last two decades and his own research over that time.
Eros and Civilization
Author: Herbert Marcuse
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807096954
Pages: 312
Year: 2015-09-29
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"A philosophical critique of psychoanalysis that takes psychoanalysis seriously but not as unchallengeable dogma. . . . The most significant general treatment of psychoanalytic theory since Freud himself ceased publication."—Clyde Kluckhohn, The New York Times
Discontent and its Civilizations
Author: Mohsin Hamid
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 069818503X
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-02-24
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From the bestselling author of How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, and Exit West, coming in March 2017, “a near-perfect essay collection, filled with insight, compassion, and intellect." (NPR) Mohsin Hamid’s brilliant, moving, and extraordinarily clever novels have not only made him an international bestseller, they have earned him a reputation as a “master critic of the modern global condition” (Foreign Policy). His stories are at once timeless and of-the-moment, and his themes are universal: love, language, ambition, power, corruption, religion, family, identity. Here he explores this terrain from a different angle in essays that deftly counterpoise the personal and the political, and are shot through with the same passion, imagination, and breathtaking shifts of perspective that gives his fiction its unmistakable electric charge. A “water lily” who has called three countries on three continents his home—Pakistan, the birthplace to which he returned as a young father; the United States, where he spent his childhood and young adulthood; and Britain, where he married and became a citizen—Hamid writes about overlapping worlds with fluidity and penetrating insight. Whether he is discussing courtship rituals or pop culture, drones or the rhythms of daily life in an extended family compound, he transports us beyond the scarifying headlines of an anxious West and a volatile East, beyond stereotype and assumption, and helps to bring a dazzling diverse global culture within emotional and intellectual reach.
Salt and Civilization
Author: S.A.M. Adshead
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1349218413
Pages: 417
Year: 2016-07-27
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'Highly recommended as a thorough examination of the commodity history of salt'-The Geographical Journal. Salt has been called the primordial addiction. It has been an object of almost universal consumption since Neolithic times. This book sets out to place the particular histories of salt in a global perspective and write the history of a human commodity as a theme in world history. From pagan man, through classical Rome, Byzantium, early Islam, the Dark Ages, the Renaissance to the modern world, the production, distribution, consumption and taxation of salt are examined. The author shows how a history of salt cannot be separated from the histories of commerce, medicine, diet, cooking, taxation, invention and war. Although taken for granted today, salt has been of critical economic and cultural importance to countries and peoples throughout history; the instigator and catalyst to actions and events ranging from the first maritime expedition of Muslim forces to Columbus's discovery of America. After Salt and Civilization salt can not be taken for granted again.
Forests
Author: Robert Pogue Harrison
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226318052
Pages: 304
Year: 2009-05-08
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In this wide-ranging exploration of the role of forests in Western thought, Robert Pogue Harrison enriches our understanding not only of the forest's place in the cultural imagination of the West, but also of the ecological dilemmas that now confront us so urgently. Consistently insightful and beautifully written, this work is especially compelling at a time when the forest, as a source of wonder, respect, and meaning, disappears daily from the earth. "Forests is one of the most remarkable essays on the human place in nature I have ever read, and belongs on the small shelf that includes Raymond Williams' masterpiece, The Country and the City. Elegantly conceived, beautifully written, and powerfully argued, [Forests] is a model of scholarship at its passionate best. No one who cares about cultural history, about the human place in nature, or about the future of our earthly home, should miss it.—William Cronon, Yale Review "Forests is, among other things, a work of scholarship, and one of immense value . . . one that we have needed. It can be read and reread, added to and commented on for some time to come."—John Haines, The New York Times Book Review
Madness and Civilization
Author: Michel Foucault
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307833100
Pages: 320
Year: 2013-01-30
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Michel Foucault examines the archeology of madness in the West from 1500 to 1800 - from the late Middle Ages, when insanity was still considered part of everyday life and fools and lunatics walked the streets freely, to the time when such people began to be considered a threat, asylums were first built, and walls were erected between the "insane" and the rest of humanity.
Against the Grain
Author: James C. Scott
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300231687
Pages: 336
Year: 2017-08-22
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An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations that contradict the standard narrative Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today’s states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family—all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction. Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the “barbarians” who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.
Babylon
Author: Paul Kriwaczek
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1429941065
Pages: 320
Year: 2012-03-27
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Civilization was born eight thousand years ago, between the floodplains of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, when migrants from the surrounding mountains and deserts began to create increasingly sophisticated urban societies. In the cities that they built, half of human history took place. In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of Mesopotamia from the earliest settlements seven thousand years ago to the eclipse of Babylon in the sixth century BCE. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period and explores the political and social systems, as well as the technical and cultural innovations, which made this land extraordinary. At the heart of this book is the story of Babylon, which rose to prominence under the Amorite king Hammurabi from about 1800 BCE. Even as Babylon's fortunes waxed and waned, it never lost its allure as the ancient world's greatest city. Engaging and compelling, Babylon reveals the splendor of the ancient world that laid the foundation for civilization itself.
Water
Author: Steven Solomon
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0060548312
Pages: 624
Year: 2011-01-18
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Far more than oil, the control of water wealth throughout history has been pivotal to the rise and fall of great powers, the achievements of civilization, the transformations of society's vital habitats, and the quality of ordinary daily lives. Today, freshwater scarcity is one of the twenty-first century's decisive, looming challenges, driving new political, economic, and environmental realities across the globe. In Water, Steven Solomon offers the first-ever narrative portrait of the power struggles, personalities, and breakthroughs that have shaped humanity from antiquity's earliest civilizations through the steam-powered Industrial Revolution and America's century. Meticulously researched and masterfully written, Water is a groundbreaking account of man's most critical resource in shaping human destinies, from ancient times to our dawning age of water scarcity.

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