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Communities of Saint Martin
Author: Sharon A. Farmer
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801423910
Pages: 358
Year: 1991
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Sharon Farmer here investigates the ways in which three medieval communities--the town of Tours, the basilica of Saint-Martin there, and the abbey of Marmoutier nearby--all defined themselves through the cult of Saint Martin. She demonstrates how in the early Middle Ages the bishops of Tours used the cult of Martin, their fourth-century predecessor, to shape an idealized image of Tours as Martin's town.
The Favor of Friends
Author: Sean J. Gilsdorf
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004264590
Pages: 226
Year: 2014-03-07
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In The Favor of Friends, Sean Gilsdorf explores the ideology and practice of intercession within early medieval aristocratic society.
Devising Order
Author: Bruno Boute, Thomas Småberg
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004236740
Pages: 316
Year: 2012-10-31
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A collection of case-studies on Ritual and Performance spanning four continents, this book offers an insightful travel guide through a thick forest of approaches and methods in a field that has increasingly weighed on the research agenda in the Humanities and the Social Sciences.
Begging Pardon and Favor
Author: Geoffrey Koziol
Publisher:
ISBN: 0801477530
Pages: 459
Year: 2011
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Koziol uncovers the dense meanings of early medieval rituals of supplication in France, illuminating the complex changes in social relations and political power in the tenth and eleventh centuries.
Declarations of Dependence
Author: Gregory Downs
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 080787776X
Pages: 360
Year: 2011-02-14
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In this highly original study, Gregory Downs argues that the most American of wars, the Civil War, created a seemingly un-American popular politics, rooted not in independence but in voluntary claims of dependence. Through an examination of the pleas and petitions of ordinary North Carolinians, Declarations of Dependence contends that the Civil War redirected, not destroyed, claims of dependence by exposing North Carolinians to the expansive but unsystematic power of Union and Confederate governments, and by loosening the legal ties that bound them to husbands, fathers, and masters. Faced with anarchy during the long reconstruction of government authority, people turned fervently to the government for protection and sustenance, pleading in fantastic, intimate ways for attention. This personalistic, or what Downs calls patronal, politics allowed for appeals from subordinate groups like freed blacks and poor whites, and also bound people emotionally to newly expanding postwar states. Downs's argument rewrites the history of the relationship between Americans and their governments, showing the deep roots of dependence, the complex impact of the Civil War upon popular politics, and the powerful role of Progressivism and segregation in submerging a politics of dependence that--in new form--rose again in the New Deal and persists today.
Honor, Vengeance, and Social Trouble
Author: Peter Arnade, Walter Prevenier
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801455758
Pages: 256
Year: 2015-02-17
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Among the more intriguing documentary sources from late medieval Europe are pardon letters—petitions sent by those condemned for serious crimes to monarchs and princes in France and the Low Countries in the hopes of receiving a full pardon. The fifteenth-century Burgundian Low Countries and duchy of Burgundy produced a large cache of these petitions, from both major cities (Bruges, Ghent, Antwerp, and Dijon) and rural communities. In Honor, Vengeance, and Social Trouble, Peter Arnade and Walter Prevenier present the first study in English of these letters to explore and interrogate the boundaries between these sources’ internal, discursive properties and the social world beyond the written text. Honor, Vengeance, and Social Trouble takes the reader out onto the streets and into the taverns, homes, and workplaces of the Burgundian territories, charting the most pressing social concerns of the day: everything from family disputes and vendettas to marital infidelity and property conflicts—and, more generally, the problems of public violence, abduction and rape, and the role of honor and revenge in adjudicating disputes. Arnade and Prevenier examine why the right to pardon was often enacted by the Burgundian dukes and how it came to compete with more traditional legal means of resolving disputes. In addition, they consider the pardon letter as a historical source, highlighting the limitations and pitfalls of relying on documents that are, by their very nature, narratives shaped by the petitioner to seek a favored outcome. The book also includes a detailed case study of a female actress turned prostitute. An example of microhistory at its best, Honor, Vengeance, and Social Trouble will challenge scholars while being accessible to students in courses on medieval and early modern Europe or on historiography.

Raiding Saint Peter
Author: Joëlle Rollo-Koster
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004165606
Pages: 265
Year: 2008
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This book argues that during the Middle Ages there was a pillaging problem attached to ecclesiastical interregna, that the nature of ecclesiastical elections contributed to the problem, and the problem in turn contributed to the initiation of the Great Western Schism.
Feud, Violence and Practice
Author: Prof Dr Tracey L Billado, Professor Belle S Tuten
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409480828
Pages: 350
Year: 2013-06-28
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This collection presents an innovative series of essays about the medieval culture of Feud and Violence. Featuring both prominent senior and younger scholars from the United States and Europe, the contributions offer various methods and points of view in their analyses. All, however, are indebted in some way to the work of Stephen D. White on legal culture, politics, and violence. White's work has frequently emphasized the importance of careful, closely focused readings of medieval sources as well as the need to take account of practice in relation to indigenous normative statements. His work has thus made historians of medieval political culture keenly aware of the ways in which various rhetorical strategies could be deployed in disputes in order to gain moral or material advantage. Beginning with an essay by the editors introducing the contributions and discussing their relationships to Stephen White's work, to the themes of the volume, to each other, and to medieval and legal studies in general, the remainder of the volume is divided into three thematic sections. The first section contains papers whose linking themes are violence and feud, the second section explores medieval legal culture and feudalism; whilst the final section consists of essays that are models of the type of inquiry pioneered by White.
From Judgment to Passion
Author: Rachel Fulton Brown
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231500769
Pages: 752
Year: 2002-12-18
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Devotion to the crucified Christ is one of the most familiar, yet most disconcerting artifacts of medieval European civilization. How and why did the images of the dying God-man and his grieving mother achieve such prominence, inspiring unparalleled religious creativity as well such imitative extremes as celibacy and self-flagellation? To answer this question, Rachel Fulton ranges over developments in liturgical performance, private prayer, doctrine, and art. She considers the fear occasioned by the disappointed hopes of medieval Christians convinced that the apocalypse would come soon, the revulsion of medieval Jews at being baptized in the name of God born from a woman, the reform of the Church in light of a new European money economy, the eroticism of the Marian exegesis of the Song of Songs, and much more. Devotion to the crucified Christ is one of the most familiar yet disconcerting artifacts of medieval European civilization. How and why did the images of the dying God-man and his grieving mother achieve such prominence, inspiring unparalleled religious creativity and emotional artistry even as they fostered such imitative extremes as celibacy, crusade, and self-flagellation? Magisterial in style and comprehensive in scope, From Judgment to Passion is the first systematic attempt to explain the origins and initial development of European devotion to Christ in his suffering humanity and Mary in her compassionate grief. Rachel Fulton examines liturgical performance, doctrine, private prayer, scriptural exegesis, and art in order to illuminate and explain the powerful desire shared by medieval women and men to identify with the crucified Christ and his mother. The book begins with the Carolingian campaign to convert the newly conquered pagan Saxons, in particular with the effort to explain for these new converts the mystery of the Eucharist, the miraculous presence of Christ's body at the Mass. Moving on to the early eleventh century, when Christ's failure to return on the millennium of his Passion (A.D. 1033) necessitated for believers a radical revision of Christian history, Fulton examines the novel liturgies and devotions that arose amid this apocalyptic disappointment. The book turns finally to the twelfth century when, in the wake of the capture of Jerusalem in the First Crusade, there occurred the full flowering of a new, more emotional sensibility of faith, epitomized by the eroticism of the Marian exegesis of the Song of Songs and by the artistic and architectural innovations we have come to think of as quintessentially high medieval. In addition to its concern with explaining devotional change, From Judgment to Passion presses a second, crucial question: How is it possible for modern historians to understand not only the social and cultural functions but also the experience of faith—the impulsive engagement with the emotions, sometimes ineffable, of prayer and devotion? The answer, magnificently exemplified throughout this book's narrative, lies in imaginative empathy, the same incorporation of self into story that lay at the heart of the medieval effort to identify with Christ and Mary in their love and pain.
Legalism
Author: Fernanda Pirie, Judith Scheele
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191025933
Pages: 260
Year: 2014-07-31
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'Community' and 'justice' recur in anthropological, historical, and legal scholarship, yet as concepts they are notoriously slippery. Historians and lawyers look to anthropologists as 'community specialists', but anthropologists often avoid the concept through circumlocution: although much used (and abused) by historians, legal thinkers, and political philosophers, the term remains strikingly indeterminate and often morally overdetermined. 'Justice', meanwhile, is elusive, alternately invoked as the goal of contemporary political theorizing, and wrapped in obscure philosophical controversy. A conceptual knot emerges in much legal and political thought between law, justice, and community, but theories abound, without any agreement over concepts. The contributors to this volume use empirical case studies to unpick threads of this knot. Local codes from Anglo-Saxon England, north Africa, and medieval Armenia indicate disjunctions between community boundaries and the subjects of local rules and categories; processes of justice from early modern Europe to eastern Tibet suggest new ways of conceptualizing the relationship between law and justice; and practices of exile that recur throughout the world illustrate contingent formulations of community. In the first book in the series, Legalism: Anthropology and History, law was addressed through a focus on local legal categories as conceptual tools. Here this approach is extended to the ideas and ideals of justice and community. Rigorous cross-cultural comparison allows the contributors to avoid normative assumptions, while opening new avenues of inquiry for lawyers, anthropologists, and historians alike.
Viator
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2009
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Cultures of Power
Author: Thomas N. Bisson
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812215559
Pages: 347
Year: 1995-07-01
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The authors of Cultures of Power proffer diverse perspectives on the prehistory of government in Northern France, Spain, Germany, the Low Countries, and England. Political, social, ecclesiastical, and cultural history are brought to bear on topics such as aristocracies, women, rituals, commemoration, and manifestations of power through literary, legal, and scriptural means.
A Favor for Fdr
Author: Derek Hart
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 0595759602
Pages: 224
Year: 2004-02-11
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In response to the fear that the Nazis were developing an atomic bomb, the US government through the OSS (forerunner of the CIA) commissioned a super-secret mission to evaluate the status of German science and to assess their progress in the area of nuclear fission. So what were the Germans really up to? The German scientists were all great minds capable of reaching the same conclusions as the American team. Were they morally against the bomb's development or did they just not understand the technical problems and concluded its development was not feasible? We may never know, because they publicly denied the possibility that such a bomb could be built, even after learning about Hiroshima and Nagasaki. US Army Captain Robert Brock makes a personal promise to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to destroy all evidence that the Germans have actually perfected the design for an atomic bomb. The "favor" takes him to Greece, Italy, France, and into Germany itself, as ALSOS races to prevent the Third Reich from using their weapon of mass destruction. Go along for a fast-paced ride as Brock delivers whatever it takes to make good on his promise, offered as a favor to FDR.
Princes' Favors
Author: Wilson J. Vance
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 266
Year: 1880
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