A Good Life To The End Taking Control Of Our Inevitable Journey Through Ageing And Death Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

A Good Life to the End
Author: Ken Hillman
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
ISBN: 192557671X
Pages: 304
Year: 2017-06-28
View: 1277
Read: 1019
A huge majority of people at the end of their lives want to die at home, but only a small number manage to do this. This vital book asks why. Many of us have experienced an elderly loved one coming to the end of their life in a hospital - over-treated, infantilised and, worst of all, facing a death without dignity. Families are being herded into making decisions that are not to the benefit of the patient. Professor Ken Hillman has worked in intensive care since its inception. But he is appalled by the way the ICU has become a place where the frail, soon-to-die and dying are given unnecessary operations and life-prolonging treatments without their wishes being taken into account. A Good Life to the End will embolden and equip us to ask about the options that doctors in hospital should offer us but mostly don't. It lets us know that there are other, gentler options for patients and their loved ones that can be much more sympathetic to the final wishes of most people facing the end of their lives. An invaluable support for the elderly as well as their families, and a rallying cry for anyone who's had to witness the unnecessary suffering of a loved one, A Good Life to the End will spark debate, challenge the status quo and change lives.
Healthcare Systems
Author: Jeffrey Braithwaite, Russell Mannion, Yukihiro Matsuyama, Paul G. Shekelle, Stuart Whittaker, Samir Al-Adawi
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1351683713
Pages: 536
Year: 2018-05-11
View: 1084
Read: 1183
This book brings together professionals who have dedicated their careers to the health system. It presents a canvas to paint their prediction of the future of healthcare. This third book complements the previous two books, Healthcare Reform, Quality, and Safety: Perspectives, Participants, Partnerships, and Prospects in 30 Countries, and Health Systems Improvement Across the Globe: Success Stories from 60 Countries, by covering from around the globe, what the future might hold for healthcare systems. Rather than focusing on western nations, like other healthcare literature, this book provides a snapshot, along with 57 case studies, of future predictions of health systems globally.
A Means to an End
Author: William R. Clark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195348397
Pages: 256
Year: 2002-02-28
View: 178
Read: 206
Why do we age? Is aging inevitable? Will advances in medical knowledge allow us to extend the human lifespan beyond its present limits? Because growing old has long been the one irreducible reality of human existence, these intriguing questions arise more often in the context of science fiction than science fact. But recent discoveries in the fields of cell biology and molecular genetics are seriously challenging the assumption that human lifespans are beyond our control. With such discoveries in mind, noted cell biologist William R. Clark clearly and skillfully describes how senescence begins at the level of individual cells and how cellular replication may be bound up with aging of the entire organism. He explores the evolutionary origin and function of aging, the cellular connections between aging and cancer, the parallels between cellular senescence and Alzheimer's disease, and the insights gained through studying human genetic disorders--such as Werner's syndrome--that mimic the symptoms of aging. Clark also explains how reduction in caloric intake may actually help increase lifespan, and how the destructive effects of oxidative elements in the body may be limited by the consumption of antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables. In a final chapter, Clark considers the social and economic aspects of living longer, the implications of gene therapy on senescence, and what we might learn about aging from experiments in cloning. This is a highly readable, provocative account of some of the most far-reaching and controversial questions we are likely to ask in the next century.
World Report on Ageing and Health
Author: World Health Organization
Publisher: World Health Organization
ISBN: 9241565047
Pages: 246
Year: 2015-10-22
View: 277
Read: 343
The WHO World report on ageing and health is not for the book shelf it is a living breathing testament to all older people who have fought for their voice to be heard at all levels of government across disciplines and sectors. - Mr Bjarne Hastrup President International Federation on Ageing and CEO DaneAge This report outlines a framework for action to foster Healthy Ageing built around the new concept of functional ability. This will require a transformation of health systems away from disease based curative models and towards the provision of older-person-centred and integrated care. It will require the development sometimes from nothing of comprehensive systems of long term care. It will require a coordinated response from many other sectors and multiple levels of government. And it will need to draw on better ways of measuring and monitoring the health and functioning of older populations. These actions are likely to be a sound investment in society's future. A future that gives older people the freedom to live lives that previous generations might never have imagined. The World report on ageing and health responds to these challenges by recommending equally profound changes in the way health policies for ageing populations are formulated and services are provided. As the foundation for its recommendations the report looks at what the latest evidence has to say about the ageing process noting that many common perceptions and assumptions about older people are based on outdated stereotypes. The report's recommendations are anchored in the evidence comprehensive and forward-looking yet eminently practical. Throughout examples of experiences from different countries are used to illustrate how specific problems can be addressed through innovation solutions. Topics explored range from strategies to deliver comprehensive and person-centred services to older populations to policies that enable older people to live in comfort and safety to ways to correct the problems and injustices inherent in current systems for long-term care.
Aging with Wisdom
Author: Olivia Ames Hoblitzelle
Publisher: Monkfish Book Publishing
ISBN: 1939681723
Pages: 224
Year: 2017-11-14
View: 220
Read: 290
How do we find beauty and meaning in old age? How do we overturn the paradigm of ageism? How do we age consciously and cultivate an inner life resilient enough to withstand the vicissitudes of old age? An extended meditation on how to age consciously and embrace life in all its fullness and wonder, Aging with Wisdom answers these questions.
How We Age
Author: Marc Agronin
Publisher: Da Capo Lifelong Books
ISBN: 0738214159
Pages: 320
Year: 2011-02-01
View: 1132
Read: 1262
In the tradition of Atul Gawande and Sherwin Nuland, Marc Agronin writes luminously and unforgettably of life as he sees it as a doctor. His beat is a nursing home in Miami that some would dismiss as “God's waiting room.” Nothing in the young doctor's medical training had quite prepared him for what he was to discover there. As Agronin first learned from ninety-eight-year-old Esther and, later, from countless others, the true scales of aging aren't one-sided—you can't list the problems without also tallying the hopes and promises. Drawing on moving personal experiences and in-depth interviews with pioneers in the field, Agronin conjures a spellbinding look at what aging means today—how our bodies and brains age, and the very way we understand aging.
Natural Causes
Author: Barbara Ehrenreich
Publisher: Twelve
ISBN: 1455535885
Pages: 256
Year: 2018-04-10
View: 1115
Read: 473
A New York Times bestseller! From the celebrated author of Nickel and Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich explores how we are killing ourselves to live longer, not better. A razor-sharp polemic which offers an entirely new understanding of our bodies, ourselves, and our place in the universe, NATURAL CAUSES describes how we over-prepare and worry way too much about what is inevitable. One by one, Ehrenreich topples the shibboleths that guide our attempts to live a long, healthy life -- from the importance of preventive medical screenings to the concepts of wellness and mindfulness, from dietary fads to fitness culture. But NATURAL CAUSES goes deeper -- into the fundamental unreliability of our bodies and even our "mind-bodies," to use the fashionable term. Starting with the mysterious and seldom-acknowledged tendency of our own immune cells to promote deadly cancers, Ehrenreich looks into the cellular basis of aging, and shows how little control we actually have over it. We tend to believe we have agency over our bodies, our minds, and even over the manner of our deaths. But the latest science shows that the microscopic subunits of our bodies make their own "decisions," and not always in our favor. We may buy expensive anti-aging products or cosmetic surgery, get preventive screenings and eat more kale, or throw ourselves into meditation and spirituality. But all these things offer only the illusion of control. How to live well, even joyously, while accepting our mortality -- that is the vitally important philosophical challenge of this book. Drawing on varied sources, from personal experience and sociological trends to pop culture and current scientific literature, NATURAL CAUSES examines the ways in which we obsess over death, our bodies, and our health. Both funny and caustic, Ehrenreich then tackles the seemingly unsolvable problem of how we might better prepare ourselves for the end -- while still reveling in the lives that remain to us.
Ending Aging
Author: Aubrey de Grey, Michael Rae
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1429931833
Pages: 400
Year: 2007-09-04
View: 532
Read: 1309
MUST WE AGE? A long life in a healthy, vigorous, youthful body has always been one of humanity's greatest dreams. Recent progress in genetic manipulations and calorie-restricted diets in laboratory animals hold forth the promise that someday science will enable us to exert total control over our own biological aging. Nearly all scientists who study the biology of aging agree that we will someday be able to substantially slow down the aging process, extending our productive, youthful lives. Dr. Aubrey de Grey is perhaps the most bullish of all such researchers. As has been reported in media outlets ranging from 60 Minutes to The New York Times, Dr. de Grey believes that the key biomedical technology required to eliminate aging-derived debilitation and death entirely—technology that would not only slow but periodically reverse age-related physiological decay, leaving us biologically young into an indefinite future—is now within reach. In Ending Aging, Dr. de Grey and his research assistant Michael Rae describe the details of this biotechnology. They explain that the aging of the human body, just like the aging of man-made machines, results from an accumulation of various types of damage. As with man-made machines, this damage can periodically be repaired, leading to indefinite extension of the machine's fully functional lifetime, just as is routinely done with classic cars. We already know what types of damage accumulate in the human body, and we are moving rapidly toward the comprehensive development of technologies to remove that damage. By demystifying aging and its postponement for the nonspecialist reader, de Grey and Rae systematically dismantle the fatalist presumption that aging will forever defeat the efforts of medical science.
A Good Death: A Practical Guide to Maintaining Control of your End-of-Life Journey
Author: C. Susan Cass RN, MS, FNP (BC)
Publisher: Balboa Press
ISBN: 1504330498
Pages: 108
Year: 2015-05-15
View: 935
Read: 520
Americans are enjoying the longest life expectancy in United States history, but what does this mean for the over seventy million aging baby boomers? It is expected the majority of the aging population will have two or more chronic health illnesses that will require frequent interactions with the healthcare system and will ultimately contribute to the decline in health realized over the years of one’s life. How do we prepare for when the natural aging process, coupled with the effects of multiple chronic health illnesses, takes its final toll and we are faced with our own mortality? How do we begin to make end-of-life decisions either for ourselves or for someone we love? In today’s complex healthcare environment with advanced technology and treatment options, A Good Death: A Practical Guide to Maintaining Control of your End-of-Life Journey is written to make the eventuality of death and dying a topic of family conversation. It is written to help the reader consider what type of care he or she would want at the end-of-life as well as encourage the reader to take the necessary steps to ensuring he receives that care. It is an invaluable tool in breaking the barrier of silence that surrounds death and dying.
Therapy Over 50
Author: Jeffrey A. Kottler, Jon Carlson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190205687
Pages: 256
Year: 2016-06-03
View: 1163
Read: 1150
Traditional training in counseling and psychotherapy makes minimal distinctions on the ages of the client and therapist in the treatment process. Therapy Over 50: Aging Issues in Psychotherapy and the Therapist's Life highlights how therapy is frequently a very different process for the older client and therapist. Specifically, this book explores: a) how therapists over 50 (or approaching that life transition) experience, struggle, and enjoy doing therapy in ways that are different from when they were younger (this includes their special challenges, adaptations, fears, and joys); and b) the landscape related to working clinically with aging clients, and those approaches and strategies that work best with this population. The text also includes both current research and classic literature on the subject of aging issues in therapy, as well as current excerpts from interviews the authors will conduct with some of the most notable aging figures in the fields of counseling, social work, marriage and family therapy, and clinical psychology.
A Better Way of Dying
Author: Jeanne Fitzpatrick, Eileen M. Fitzpatrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101195606
Pages: 240
Year: 2010-01-26
View: 507
Read: 1094
The fail-safe plan for ensuring one's final wishes are respected Advanced directives and living wills have improved our ability to dictate end-of-life care, but even these cannot guaran­tee that we will be allowed the dignity of a natural death. Designed by two sisters-one a doctor, one a lawyer-and drawing on their decades of experience, the five-step Compassion Protocol outlined in A Better Way of Dying offers a simple and effective framework for leaving caretakers concrete, unambiguous, and legally binding instructions about your wishes for your last days. Meant for people in every walk of life-from the elderly, to those in the early stages of mentally degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, to healthy young people planning for an unpredictable future-this book creates space for a discussion we all must have if we wish to ensure comfort and control at the end of our lives..
A Bittersweet Season
Author: Jane Gross
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030747240X
Pages: 434
Year: 2012
View: 161
Read: 602
In telling the story of her own struggle to learn how to care for her aging and ailing mother, a journalist offers helpful insights and advice to other caregivers who feel overwhelmed. Reprint.
Life's Final Season: A Guide for Aging and Dying with Grace
Author: Richard Powell Holm
Publisher: Richard P Holm Life's Final Season
ISBN: 1732544816
Pages: 432
Year: 2018-08-24
View: 1143
Read: 459
This book is a guide for caregivers and for the elderly. Holm advises how to live longer, the wisdom of avoiding poly-pharmacy, the danger in being a boomer, and how to understand medical ethics. He explains how to understand dementia, how to avoid physical and emotional abuse, how to make a living will and how to face dying and death without fear.
Cracking the Aging Code
Author: Josh Mitteldorf, Dorion Sagan
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250061709
Pages: 336
Year: 2016-06-14
View: 1159
Read: 411
A revolutionary examination of why we age, what it means for our health, and how we just might be able to fight it. In Cracking the Aging Code, theoretical biologist Josh Mitteldorf and award-winning writer and ecological philosopher Dorion Sagan reveal that evolution and aging are even more complex and breathtaking than we originally thought. Using meticulous multidisciplinary science, as well as reviewing the history of our understanding about evolution, this book makes the case that aging is not something that “just happens,” nor is it the result of wear and tear or a genetic inevitability. Rather, aging has a fascinating evolutionary purpose: to stabilize populations and ecosystems, which are ever-threatened by cyclic swings that can lead to extinction. When a population grows too fast it can put itself at risk of a wholesale wipeout. Aging has evolved to help us adjust our growth in a sustainable fashion as well as prevent an ecological crisis from starvation, predation, pollution, or infection. This dynamic new understanding of aging is provocative, entertaining, and pioneering, and will challenge the way we understand aging, death, and just what makes us human.
Waiting for the Last Bus
Author: Richard Holloway
Publisher: Canongate Books
ISBN: 1786890232
Pages: 176
Year: 2018-03-01
View: 982
Read: 167
Where do we go when we die? Or is there nowhere to go? Is death something we can do or is it just something that happens to us? Now in his ninth decade, former Bishop of Edinburgh Richard Holloway has spent a lifetime at the bedsides of the dying, guiding countless men and women towards peaceful deaths. In The Last Bus, he presents a positive, meditative and profound exploration of the many important lessons we can learn from death: facing up to the limitations of our bodies as they falter, reflecting on our failings, and forgiving ourselves and others. But in a modern world increasingly wary of acknowledging mortality, The Last Bus is also a stirring plea to reacquaint ourselves with death. Facing and welcoming death gives us the chance to think about not only the meaning of our own life, but of life itself; and can mean the difference between ordinary sorrow and unbearable regret at the end. Radical, joyful and moving, The Last Bus is an invitation to reconsider life's greatest mystery by one of the most important and beloved religious leaders of our time.

Recently Visited